Collagen and Menstrual Cycle- How Does Collagen Affect Periods?

There is a lot of debate surrounding collagen and its effects on the body. Some people claim that collagen supplements can help with everything from joint pain to wrinkles.

But what about women's health? Can collagen supplements help with menstrual cycle or other body composition issues related to your period?

Some believe that consuming collagen supplements can help regulate the menstrual cycle and make periods more regular.

Others think that collagen can cause cramps and other PMS symptoms. So, what does science say?

In this blog post, we will explore the relationship between collagen and menstrual cycle and see if there is any truth to the claims.

Why is Collagen Essential for Women's Health?

Collagen and Menstrual Cycle

Before we dive into the effects of collagen on the menstrual cycle, let's first take a step back and understand why collagen is important for women's health.

Collagen makes for up to 90 in our bodies. It is found in our skin, hair, nails, bones, and joints. This protein provides strength and structure to these tissues.

As we age, our bodies produce less collagen, leading to wrinkles, joint pain, and other problems.

Some people believe that taking collagen supplements or collagen powder can help prevent or reverse these effects of aging.

There is some evidence to support this claim. A study published in the National Library of Medicine found that women who took a collagen supplement for a consecutive period of time had less skin dryness and wrinkles.

Collagen is composed of amino acids that are required to keep the body running smoothly, such as:

  • Glycine (healthy DNA structure).
  • Creatine (energy production).
  • Proline (digestive health).
  • Hydroxyproline (tendons and muscles repair).

So, you definitely want to give collagen a shot. But which collagen type is the best?

Different Types of Collagen

There are different types of collagen, which are classified based on their structure. The most common subtypes are:

Chicken

People frequently praise bone broth for its advantages to gut health, particularly this collagen type's healing effects.

When stored in the fridge, a good bone broth will form a gel, showing that the collagen has been drawn from the bones to provide maximum nourishment.

Chicken collagen has a plethora of bioactive components that can help with digestive problems, boost the immune system, and reduce joint pain.

Marine

Fish collagen is the most readily absorbed form of collagen available.

Taking collagen is an excellent source of absorbable protein and has wonderful and significant effect on your health. It helps maintain blood sugar levels, reduces inflammation, and heals cuts and wounds.

Fish collagen is also the most bioavailable form due to the smaller particles of collagen peptides.

Bovine

Bovine collagen is derived from cows and is best for respiratory issues, muscle recovery, and better sleep. It's also good for hair and nail growth (which all collagen is good for).

Bovine collagen contains Type 1 and Type III subtypes. Type I makes up tendons, bones, and ligaments, and Type III is in bone marrow, cartilage, and connective tissues.

You can take bovine collagen supplements or collagen powder.

Eggshell Membrane

This is made up of both Type I and Type V collagen peptides, which collaborate to promote connective and joint tissue health.

Eggshell membrane comprises about 40% collagen and 60% other proteins, minerals, and glycosaminoglycans.

It's a popular collagen supplement for those with joint pain because it can help to reduce inflammation and improve their range of motion. It's also an excellent choice for those who want to increase their muscle mass.

So, Can Collagen Affect Your menstrual Cycle?

So, Can Collagen Affect Your menstrual Cycle

Now that we know all about collagen, let's answer the question on everyone's mind: can taking collagen affect your normal menstrual cycles?

The short answer is: maybe. Analysis of collagen metabolism markers proved that cycle phases did not inherently affect them nor do they have any significant decrease.

There is some anecdotal evidence that taking collagen supplements or collagen powder can help regulate the menstrual cycle.

One theory based on the analysis of collagen metabolism markers is that because collagen is rich in glycine, it can help to balance estrogen levels in the body.

Glycine is an amino acid that acts as a precursor to glutathione, which is a powerful antioxidant that helps to detoxify the liver. This, in turn, can help to regulate estrogen levels.

Another theory is that because collagen is good for gut health, it can help to reduce inflammation in the body. This can also lead to a balanced menstrual cycle.

One thing's for sure. If you're struggling with irregular menstrual cycle, it can't hurt to try taking a collagen supplement.

It's safe, natural, and has a host of other health advantages. And who knows? Maybe it will help to regulate your menstrual cycle.

Can Collagen Protein Cause Hormonal Imbalance?

Can Collagen Protein Cause Hormonal Imbalance

No, collagen doesn't really have a significant effect on hormonal imbalance or hormone levels.

Collagen is one of the few supplements you can't go wrong with due to its widespread popularity and beneficial collagen subtypes, which are mostly responsible for minimal hormone modulation.

The increased bioavailability is also a benefit.

Collagen plays a response to injury and trauma, as well as new tissue growth.

Collagen protein is found in our skin, cartilage, tendons, bones, ligaments, blood vessels, and other places in our bodies. It's a structural protein important for healthy metabolism as well as our own collagen production.

The three amino acids present-- proline, glycine, and hydroxyproline--are all produced by your body, although not enough to be beneficial. That's why collagen supplementation is absolutely essential!

Glycine is a neurotransmitter that may be obtained through diet. It's also found in certain foods such as eggs and dairy products.

The human body requires around 15 grams of glycine collagen intake each day — but the average person consumes only three grams.

What's the Difference Between Collagen and Gelatin?

Differences

You've probably heard collagen and gelatin referred to as the same thing. That's because gelatin is a component of collagen.

Collagen breaks down to gelatin when it is heated. It does so, for example, while you are making chicken soup or bone broth.

Gelatin is how we can most easily obtain the advantages of collagen, which is why it's also found in supplement form. Collagen and gelatin have similar nutritional profiles and benefits since they originate from the same source.

Cooking collagen is the most effective approach to getting its health benefits, though taking it in raw supplement form is also an option.

How Much Collagen Should You Take?

How Much Collagen Should You Take?

The amount of collagen protein you should take depends on your goals. If you want to improve your skin health, you might take a lower dose than someone trying to increase their muscle mass.

Most studies use doses between two and ten grams per day. It's best to start with a lower dose and increase it gradually to see how your body responds.

You can increase your collagen intake in powder, capsule, or liquid form. It's also available in gummies and bars.

No matter which form you choose, make sure you're getting collagen from a reputable source. Look for products that are third-party tested and made from actual food sources.

More Collagen FAQs

Can you take collagen even when you're pregnant or breastfeeding?

Yes, it's perfectly safe to take collagen supplements with amino acids when pregnant or breastfeeding. Just make sure you're getting it from a reputable source and not taking more than the recommended dose.

If you're unsure whether collagen is right for you, talk to your doctor.

Is collagen vegan?

No, collagen is not vegan. It's made from animal products, so vegans will want to avoid it. Currently, there is no real plant-based collagen on the market.

What are the side effects of taking collagen?

The most common side effect of collagen supplements is digestive upset, such as bloating, gas, or constipation.

This is more likely to occur if you take too much at once or if you're not used to taking supplements. Start with a lower dose and increase gradually to avoid this.

If you have any other concerns, talk to your doctor before taking collagen.

Can collagen make you gain weight?

No, collagen will not make you gain weight. In fact, it may even help you lose weight by reducing inflammation and promoting a healthy metabolism.

Of course, every body is different, so you may want to talk to your doctor before taking collagen if you're concerned about how it will affect your weight.

Is it better to take collagen in the morning or at night?

There is no right or wrong answer to this question. It's really up to you and when you feel like taking it.

If you're ingesting collagen supplements for joint pain, you might find it works better if you take it at night before bed. If you're taking it for skin health, you might want to take it in the morning so that it has all day to work its magic.

As with any supplement, it's always best to talk to your doctor before you start taking collagen. They can help you figure out the best time of day to take it based on your individual needs.

The Bottom Line

Can collagen affect your menstrual cycle? Based on the current evidence, it's unlikely that collagen has any impact on the menstrual cycle. However, more research on body composition is needed to confirm this.

If you're interested in ingesting collagen supplements for other health reasons, such as improving your skin or joint health, then it's safe to do so. Just make sure you're getting it from a reputable source and not taking more than the recommended dose.

As always, talk to your doctor before starting any new supplement. They can help you determine if collagen supplements are right for you and how much you should take.

Have you tried taking collagen? Any effect on your menstrual cycle? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

Leave a comment

All comments are moderated before being published